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    1. Jim Wang

      October 5th, 2015 at 7:53 am

      A lot of this comes back to a basic human need to avoid loss and rejection, we feel it far more acutely than any wins or gains. We don’t ask for more because we don’t want to hear a ‘no.’

      The reality is that rarely is it ever a flat out ‘no.’ It’s usually going to be some kind of negotiation and the better equipped you are to negotiate, with information like salary and your contributions or tactics like letting silence lie, the more you’re able to get. And if you are ever concerned about the stakes, just think about what an extra $20,000 a year would mean!

    2. Stefanie

      October 5th, 2015 at 8:24 am

      Agreed. Being mindful of the potential win of a successful negotiation in the midst of the anxiety of asking is a good way to stay motivated.

    3. Natalie @ Financegirl

      October 5th, 2015 at 8:05 am

      I am trying to make more money from my business (blogging, freelance writing, etc.). There’s a certain gratification that comes from doing it yourself.

    4. Stefanie

      October 5th, 2015 at 8:25 am

      There’s a huuuge gratification from DIY. I’m also learning that self-employment suits my personality type best. I love collaborating, but hate authority, haha.

    5. Mrs. Budgets @MrandMrsBudgets

      October 5th, 2015 at 8:27 am

      I think learning to live frugally is the single best thing everyone should do. How many stories do you here about people who are making good incomes yet are still broke? They’ve never learned to live below their means and save money. But there will come a point when you can’t save anymore and you will need to make more money. Your tips about negotiation and being confident are spot on. I think that is were most people fall short and then never ask for a raise. I have been with my company 2 years and have asked for a raise 3 times (when I got hired and at my 2 annual reviews), they’ve said yes twice. I think that’s pretty good.

    6. Stefanie

      October 5th, 2015 at 8:52 am

      I’ve always been super frugal and I think it’s critical, cause like you said, you can make a fortune and still be broke. But for the longest time I got stuck in the mindset of “I’m doing everything I can” without taking a look at the income side of the equation. When I finally put some energy there, my life transformed.

    7. Hannah

      October 5th, 2015 at 9:07 am

      Rethinking your approach can be critical, especially if you’re changing industries. I am a strong believer in the idea of not starting at the bottom all over again. As I’m working on a career change, my goal is to earn an equivalent hourly rate even if it means saying no to a few opportunities. I’ve found some success with this, and I’m working on pitching more.

    8. Stefanie

      October 5th, 2015 at 9:32 am

      Even though my background and experience are arguably irrelevant, I’ve found myself being recruited for positions that typically call for a masters degree and several years experience. If you can bring enough value and skill to the table, you don’t have to start from square one, like you said- even if it’s an entirely new industry.

    9. Michelle

      October 5th, 2015 at 10:25 am

      I worked for a long time at a great job. HOWEVER, during that time I became very frustrated because no matter how much work I put out and revenue that I brought in-I wasn’t going to be compensated in what I felt was matching my efforts. I love how I am managing my own “raises” via-what I ask for and being able to walk away from mistreatment, etc. when a situation isn’t working out for ME. It’s a refreshing change of pace. I love this post btw.

    10. Stefanie

      October 5th, 2015 at 10:27 am

      Being willing to walk away is definitely a powerful position from which to negotiate. Thanks for sharing Michelle!

    11. Shannyn @ Frugal Beautiful

      October 5th, 2015 at 1:32 pm

      This is such good advice, especially for women, who are afraid of asking for more (or have a habit of making raises about themselves, because we feel the need to justify it). Love it!! We all need to start believing we deserve more because of the value we bring. Frugality alone won’t cut it in the long run.

    12. Kate @ Cashville Skyline

      October 5th, 2015 at 1:48 pm

      I can totally relate to this, Stefanie! I was so focused on saving before that I wasn’t actively trying to earn more. Because, you’re totally right, there’s only so much you can cut back. Learning to negotiate for what you’re worth is the most valuable skill you can develop. I like being able to do this on a regular basis with freelance work.

    13. Tonya@Budget and the Beach

      October 5th, 2015 at 2:55 pm

      I’m working on getting rid of the low hanging fruit (aka freelance jobs) that take too much time and do not pay me enough. It’s scary because you risk that little odds and ends money that sometimes carries you through, but I think you are putting something out to the universe that says I’ll work for table scraps.

    14. diane @smartmoneysimplelife

      October 5th, 2015 at 4:53 pm

      This is my challenge now. I’ve cut costs as far as I can (and stay sane) so now it’s time to look at the other side of the ledger – income. Mine’s been going in the wrong direction for the last year or so and it’s time to do something constructive about it.

      Sometimes it’s easy to get caught up in the time consuming but low paying activities when you really ought to be looking for better paying opportunities and ones that can be leveraged.

    15. Shannon @ Financially Blonde

      October 5th, 2015 at 5:44 pm

      I always tell my clients who get saving and cost cutting fatigue to just make more money. I know that for some people it seems easier said that done, but with a plan and realistic strategy it is easy. It may sometimes take time to full execute because you have to build relationships and credentials, but the time invested will absolutely pay off when you’re ready to take it to the next level.

    16. Melanie @ Dear Debt

      October 5th, 2015 at 9:20 pm

      Great tips! Raising my rates and asking for more have been so helpful for me in so many ways. I’m conquering debt at a much faster rate!

    17. Jayson @ Monster Piggy Bank

      October 6th, 2015 at 6:30 am

      After reading your post Stef, now I know how to make more money in a better perspective compared before. I know this guide you provide would help me find a source of income that is perfect for me.

    18. Cat@BudgetBlonde

      October 6th, 2015 at 10:54 am

      I just love this concept and being self employed has really opened my eyes to all the possibilities. It’s amazing I even thought of myself as a 30k per year 9-5er. I don’t know how I could have been so short sighted. Now I know the sky is the limit!

    19. Ramona

      October 6th, 2015 at 2:33 pm

      Being frugal is always a great idea, since it maximizes what you can do with your money. And some savers have done way more with small wages, while others squandered fortunes. But getting more money to save/ spend is even a better idea. It opens up new ‘doors’ and you can save more aggressively, pursue your dreams and make it all happen.

      To be honest, I was NEVER good with getting paid the right salary, so it’s good I’m not employed anymore. On the other hands, setting realistic rates has also been an issue, since I still tend to undercharge.

    20. Holly@ClubThrifty

      October 7th, 2015 at 8:21 am

      The potential for more money is one reason I love self-employment so much. I don’t have to convince anyone to pay me more – I just how to figure out how to make it happen! But yeah, I agree with you. Frugality can only take you so far.

    21. How to Build an Actor Budget

      October 12th, 2015 at 1:55 pm

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      October 12th, 2015 at 2:58 pm

      […] To keep your expenses within the 50-60% range of your income, particularly on a low income, you have to master mindfulness and conscious spending. If you only bring home $2,000/month, that means you need to figure out how to live on $1,000. If you’re living beyond that 50-60% of your income range, or even 70% if you’ve given yourself a little more breathing room on the expense end, it’s a sign that you either need to cut your cost of living or earn more. […]

    23. Christina Garofalo

      October 14th, 2015 at 10:35 am

      I need to do some rethinking of my offerings as well. It seems like writing opportunities are everywhere, but they aren’t always easy to get. By starting to get more established in taking my own photos to accompany my articles, I am hoping to be able to ask more for my work.

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    25. Marcel Rosa

      October 23rd, 2015 at 3:43 am

      Thank you for sharing. It’s very useful. Hope to hear more from you.

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      October 29th, 2015 at 7:55 am

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    29. Andy Hill

      November 14th, 2016 at 9:35 pm

      Good reminder! When speaking with my employer and money comes up, I’m always looking to showcase the value (or monetary benefit) that I bring to the company. Review time is coming up! I better craft my story!

    30. Stefanie

      November 15th, 2016 at 1:47 pm

      haha, yes, gotta walk in prepared to show that value 🙂

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